BASH COOKBOOK BY CARL ALBING PDF

Scripting is a way to harness and customize the power of any Unix system, and it's an essential skill for any Unix users, including system administrators and professional OS X developers. But beneath this simple promise lies a treacherous ocean of variations in Unix commands and standards. It presents a variety of recipes and tricks for all levels of shell programmers so that anyone can become a proficient user of the most common Unix shell -- the bash shell -- and cygwin or other popular Unix emulation packages. Packed full of useful scripts, along with examples that explain how to create better scripts, this new cookbook gives professionals and power users everything they need to automate routine tasks and enable them to truly manage their systems -- rather than have their systems manage them.

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Explore a preview version of bash Cookbook, 2nd Edition right now. For system administrators, programmers, and end users, shell command or carefully crafted shell script can save you time and effort, or facilitate consistency and repeatability for a variety of common tasks. This cookbook provides more than practical recipes for using bash , the popular Unix shell that enables you to harness and customize the power of any Unix or Linux system.

Ideal for new and experienced users alike—including proficient Windows users and sysadmins—this updated second edition helps you solve a wide range of problems.

Each recipe includes one or more scripting examples and a discussion of why the solution works. Skip to main content. Start your free trial. Book Description For system administrators, programmers, and end users, shell command or carefully crafted shell script can save you time and effort, or facilitate consistency and repeatability for a variety of common tasks.

Show and hide more. Table of Contents Product Information. Why bash? The bash Shell 1. Decoding the Prompt 1. Showing Where You Are 1. Finding and Running Commands 1. Getting Information About Files 1. Using Shell Quoting 1. Using or Replacing Builtins and External Commands 1. Determining if You Are Running Interactively 1. Setting bash as Your Default Shell 1.

Keeping bash Updated 1. Getting bash for Linux 1. Getting bash for xBSD 1. Getting bash for macOS 1. Getting bash for Unix 1. Getting bash for Windows 1. Getting bash Without Getting bash 1.

Writing Output but Preserving Spacing 2. Writing Output with More Formatting Control 2. Writing Output Without the Newline 2. Saving Output from a Command 2. Saving Output to Other Files 2. Saving Output from the ls Command 2.

Appending Rather than Clobbering Output 2. Using Just the Beginning or End of a File 2. Skipping a Header in a File 2. Throwing Output Away 2. Saving or Grouping Output from Several Commands 2. Using Multiple Redirects on One Line 2. Keeping Files Safe from Accidental Overwriting 2. Clobbering a File on Purpose Standard Input 3. Getting Input from a File 3. Keeping Your Data with Your Script 3. Preventing Weird Behavior in a Here-Document 3. Indenting Here-Documents 3.

Getting User Input 3. Getting Yes or No Input 3. Selecting from a List of Options 3. Prompting for a Password Executing Commands 4. Running Any Executable 4. Running Several Commands in Sequence 4. Running Several Commands All at Once 4. Telling Whether a Command Succeeded or Not 4. Using Fewer if Statements 4.

Running Long Jobs Unattended 4. Running Commands from a Variable 4. Documenting Your Script 5. Embedding Documentation in Shell Scripts 5. Promoting Script Readability 5. Separating Variable Names from Surrounding Text 5. Exporting Variables 5. Seeing All Variable Values 5. Using Parameters in a Shell Script 5. Looping Over Arguments Passed to a Script 5. Handling Parameters with Spaces 5. Handling Lists of Parameters with Spaces 5. Counting Arguments 5. Consuming Arguments 5.

Getting Default Values 5. Setting Default Values 5. Using null as a Valid Default Value 5. Giving an Error Message for Unset Parameters 5. Changing Pieces of a String 5. Getting the Absolute Value of a Number 5. Using bash for basename 5. Using bash for dirname 5. Using Array Variables 5. Converting Between Upper- and Lowercase 5.

Doing Arithmetic in Your Shell Script 6. Branching on Conditions 6. Testing for File Characteristics 6. Testing for More than One Thing 6. Testing for String Characteristics 6. Testing for Equality 6.

Testing with Pattern Matches 6. Testing with Regular Expressions 6. Changing Behavior with Redirections 6. Looping for a While 6. Looping with a read 6. Looping with a Count 6. Looping with Floating-Point Values 6. Branching Many Ways 6. Parsing Command-Line Arguments 6.

Creating Simple Menus 6. Changing the Prompt on Simple Menus 6. Sifting Through Files for a String 7. Getting Just the Filename from a Search 7. Searching for Text While Ignoring Case 7. Doing a Search in a Pipeline 7.

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bash Cookbook

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Bash Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Bash Users

For system administrators, programmers, and end users, shell command or carefully crafted shell script can save you time and effort, or facilitate consistency and repeatability for a variety of common tasks. This cookbook provides more than practical recipes for using bash , the popular Unix shell that enables you to harness and customize the power of any Unix or Linux system. Ideal for new and experienced users alike—including proficient Windows users and sysadmins—this updated second edition helps you solve a wide range of problems. Each recipe includes one or more scripting examples and a discussion of why the solution works. Naval Academy where he is teaching courses on programming languages and on High Performance Computing.

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