CABOTAGE POLICY MALAYSIA PDF

For some of these nations, it is so strictly implemented that no foreign-owned vessels are even allowed to operate within their domestic waters. This policy also acts as a platform for local shipping companies to gradually expand and reach out into international waters. Foreign vessels are also allowed to operate within the domestic sector through the granting of an exemption issued by the Domestic Licensing Board upon fulfilling the criteria set. Location Tel : Fax : Email : webmiti[ ]miti. Advance Search.

Author:Daile Dagul
Country:Hungary
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Software
Published (Last):7 February 2005
Pages:325
PDF File Size:19.81 Mb
ePub File Size:19.33 Mb
ISBN:747-9-52760-848-6
Downloads:16587
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Akizshura



At a time when many offshore support vessel "OSV" owning companies are struggling due to the global fall in oil prices and over capacity, those owners with partnerships across the region which allow them access to cabotage areas are perhaps faring better than their competitors.

Malaysia in particular is a cabotage area that is still viewed by some as an area of potential growth. Malaysia consists of three federal territories and thirteen states located in Peninsula Malaysia bordering Thailand and East Malaysia in the island of Borneo bordering Brunei and Indonesia. On 1 January , the Government of Malaysia implemented a national cabotage policy with an aim to protect and promote a strong national shipping-owning industry.

The MSO further provides that only a Malaysian ship may engage in domestic shipping. Section 11 of the MSO sets out the requirements of a Malaysian ship as a ship which is wholly owned by-. The Malaysian cabotage policy includes ships used in the offshore industry within its exclusive economic zone. However, ships under 15 nett tonnes and licensed boats are excluded. In there was a partial liberalisation of the policy allowing the carriage of containerised transhipment cargo between certain ports in Peninsula Malaysia and East Malaysia and more recently, in an exception was made for passenger cruise ships.

The master, owner or agent of any ship which contravenes these provisions will be guilty of an offence and upon conviction be liable to a fine.

It is recognised however that in some cases there may be insufficient Malaysian ships to meet domestic demand. This has certainly been true in the offshore shipping industry. There are provisions which therefore allow a foreign ship to engage in domestic shipping upon proof that there are insufficient Malaysian ships to meet current demand. However, such licenses are only granted on a temporary basis up to a maximum period of 3 months. For Malaysian ships, licences may be granted either with or without conditions for a period of between 6 months to 2 years.

When Malaysian legal advice is required, we work closely with Malaysian correspondent lawyers. For further advice or should you have any questions, please feel free to contact:.

James P. The Panel has recommended the abolition…. In there was a partial liberalisation of the policy allowing the carriage of containerised transhipment cargo between certain ports in Peninsula Malaysia and East Malaysia and more recently, in an exception was made for passenger cruise ships The master, owner or agent of any ship which contravenes these provisions will be guilty of an offence and upon conviction be liable to a fine.

For further advice or should you have any questions, please feel free to contact: James P. Printable PDF. Related content.

AFAQS REPORTER PDF

Cabotage Policy

We would like to ensure that you are still receiving content that you find useful — please confirm that you would like to continue to receive ILO newsletters. Overview Proposed change. The main objective of the policy was to safeguard and promote the domestic shipping industry and for Port Klang to be the container hub port in Malaysia. Under the policy, both foreign and Malaysian ships can discharge cargo at any port, but the parties must engage Malaysian-registered vessels to transport goods to Sabah and Sarawak.

CATEHEZE ORTODOXE PDF

Insight & Knowledge

At a time when many offshore support vessel "OSV" owning companies are struggling due to the global fall in oil prices and over capacity, those owners with partnerships across the region which allow them access to cabotage areas are perhaps faring better than their competitors. Malaysia in particular is a cabotage area that is still viewed by some as an area of potential growth. Malaysia consists of three federal territories and thirteen states located in Peninsula Malaysia bordering Thailand and East Malaysia in the island of Borneo bordering Brunei and Indonesia. On 1 January , the Government of Malaysia implemented a national cabotage policy with an aim to protect and promote a strong national shipping-owning industry. The MSO further provides that only a Malaysian ship may engage in domestic shipping.

DESDE EL FRENTE ROBACIO PDF

Changes to National Cabotage Policy

While this exemption will not apply to cargo shipment within Sabah, Sarawak and Labuan, the implications of the cabotage lift for shipments to and from these ports are far-reaching. Foreign vessels are allowed to discharge cargo at any port in Malaysia but are not allowed to move the cargo within the country. Section 11 of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance defines a Malaysian vessel as being wholly owned by The main objective of the cabotage laws was to safeguard and protect the domestic shipping industry. Following its implementation, this protectionist policy has been liberalised through the years.

Related Articles