DEAD NAMES THE DARK HISTORY OF THE NECRONOMICON PDF

The Necronomicon Project, once hosted by Arrakis. This was a great read. Simon sure can weave a tale, though in this book he recounts the rather bizarre story of how the famous grimoire — The Necronomicon — ie. The Book of Dead Names, fell into his hands. It has been assumed, according to internet analysis and a book that has been written, that the Necronomicon is a hoax, invented and perpetuated by Simon and his colleagues. Simon a professed pseudonym here presents his argument that the Necronimocon is a real textual grimoire written in Greek by an Arab late in the first millenium CE.

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The Necronomicon Project, once hosted by Arrakis. This was a great read. Simon sure can weave a tale, though in this book he recounts the rather bizarre story of how the famous grimoire — The Necronomicon — ie. The Book of Dead Names, fell into his hands. It has been assumed, according to internet analysis and a book that has been written, that the Necronomicon is a hoax, invented and perpetuated by Simon and his colleagues. Simon a professed pseudonym here presents his argument that the Necronimocon is a real textual grimoire written in Greek by an Arab late in the first millenium CE.

He shows the actual newspaper article about the two priests implicated in the thefts. Simon is apparently a priest of the Eastern Orthodox sect who became more and more interested in ceremonial magick as time passed. He does a great job of painting a picture of that time and place.

Simon does mention in the preface that he does at times attribute conduct to himself to protect the privacy of some others — particularly ecclesiastical personnel — involved, who do not wish to risk their reputations. P Lovecraft who apparently mentions both the book and a bit of its content.

If this is true we are left to ponder how Lovecraft knew about it which remains unanswered. The Sumerian script and pronunciation was not recovered and interpreted until the late 19 th century.

This can only mean that there was a tradition practicing with Sumerian deities until the late Dark Ages when the Arab composed the text. Certainly Sumerian would have been known to the later Babylonians and Assyrians. Simon suggests that it was kept up by tribal peoples.

If the text did emanate from Arabia — it would not be so far-fetched as Arabia is very close geographically to southern Iraq and ancient Sumer and Babylon. Yemen is also an area referred to in ancient and modern works in the Necronomicon and in works on Arabic magick. He tells the story of Andrew Prazsky, who became a bishop of the Slavonic Orthodox Church at a young age under bizarre circumstances and his friend, the writer Peter Lavenda.

Prazsky started his own church, was a collector of church paraphernalia and rare occult texts , a well known homosexual, a shyster, and employer of the two priests convicted in the rare book heists. Simon thinks that he burned the manuscripts, including the Necronomicom, out of fear of being implicated. Prazsky died under mysterious circumstances — possibly accidental but likely a suicide. His aged father committed suicide before him by hanging himself in the church on the eve of the Russian Orthodox Christmas.

Simon tells the stories of all these people but notes that the history was not all dark as many people did quite well. He tells the story of a vibrant occult scene that included varied groups and types of people from Wicca, paganism, OTO, Church of Satan, Process Church this one an offshoot from Scientology , New Age, and even the Son of Sam Cult that was implicated in several serial murders and animal sacrifices.

Simon was apparently involved in the staging of fests such as the performance of the Rock Opera Book of the Law — which incidentally is why I originally got the book — as I was looking for info on this — I have it on a cassette somewhere but not much can be found on the internet about it.

The performance and recording was done by a band called Black 47 though they may have been called — The Major Thinkers — then.

A guy named Larry Kirwan is credited with some of the music. His band, Black 47, is apparently quite popular now as an Irish band in NYC area and has done music for many movies. People congregated around a pub called Bells of Hell and Simon was part of a group called StarGroup One that put things together media and magic-wise. Even the Marvel Comics crowd were among the folk.

Later in the book Simon gives updates on several of these folk. This happened before they became recognized priests and helped authenticate them. Simon talks about the appearance of the book, his getting various people to translate it from the Greek and other people to re-draw all the sigils in the book. Many people have criticized this format for a secret and potentially dangerous grimoire but Simon seems to like that it was available to people at low cost.

There is much discussion also of young occultists working with it as a symbol of the self-professed and quite reckless teenage satanist. The book was found to be possessed by a small teenage cult who committed murder and was suggested to be possibly implicated in other occult crimes but Simon shrugs off such nonsense.

The Son of Sam Cult was an exception. Ritual murders were committed by them as part of an offshoot of the Process Church which was itself an offshoot of Scientology. This Cult had nothing to do with the Necronomicon but some of its members undoubtably crossed paths and shared events with others in the general occult community of the time and place. Simon gives has own interesting analysis of troubled teenager occultism below:.

Those who are powerless in any other way — politically, economically, socially — can seek solace in these forbidden books and a means to self-empowerment. That is why troubled and disturbed teenagers find the occult so fascinating, for they are suffering from two forms of stress: the normal stress of being adolescent in a world full of stimulation and excess, and the stress that comes from psychological imbalance and disorder.

In effect, these troubled youths are potential shamans for they fit many of the requirements of shamanism as described in works by Mircea Eliade, for instance: mental disorders, confusion over sexual identity, creative sensitivity, social ostracism. In the case of the shamans, the initiate returns to the tribe empowered by the spirits to fulfill a necessary role as healer and seer.

He either outgrows this fascination with the occult as he forces himself into some semblance of balance or conformity, or he turns into a Roderick Ferrell and looks for sacrificial victims. There is rarely a desire to turn to organized religion for comfort or understanding, since the whole point of the occult quest is to seek out an alternative form of spiritual expression, one that provides avenue for the deep conflicts one is experiencing as well as an outlet for the anti-social acts he feels driven to commit.

Organized religion is ill-equipped to deal in a constructive way with feelings of anger, rage, lust, and the other, baser human emotions and instincts. Its approach has always been to control or exorcise those feelings, to rein them in or banish them entirely. The occultist — especially the young, adolescent occultist — distrusts that approach to what he believes are his natural inclinations.

Part 2 of the book is called — The Sumerian Tradition and the Hidden God — and this part I found to be rather fascinating. He suggests that there are so many references to Sumerian and later Akkadian and Babylonian civilizations that the grimoire is a unique survival of an occult system that made its way through various changes of empire and was glossed over by the popular neo-Platonic forms of Hermetic magick of the Mediterranean areas of the early years of the first millenium. It is well known that the Babylonians and Akkadians preserved the Sumerian language as well as Sumerian religion and magic.

According to Simon:. Simon suggests that the Toda people of Southwest India were Sumerians that had fled and eventually landed there. Their stone monuments and the symbols thereon — eight petaled star flower, seven pointed stars, lunar crescent horns, and scorpions are very similar to Sumerian monuments and so to is their god On — to the Sumerian An, or Anu. Sumerian loan words are thought to be in their language — which is an Elamite-Dravidian dialect. The Elamites came from Iran northeast of Mesopotamia but their precursor culture may have as well been the Sumerian precursor culture as well as perhaps the Indus Valley culture.

Genetic markers of the Toda — which is a very small tribal population — are apparently much different than most Indians, and they are much lighter skinned than most South Indian Dravidians. The example of he Toda is given as one possibility as to how a Sumerian tradition could survive. Next he talks about the cult of the Yezidis in northern Iraq that have Shaitan as a deity. This is thought to be similar to the Canaanite deity Asiz. Azazel is also the scapegoat of the Jews, carrier of the sins away into the wilderness.

The very fact that these deities Azazel, Shaitan [Satan] are demons and devils in Islamic and later ceremonial magick traditions suggests that perhaps they were gods in earlier cultures. Simon links the Yezidi beliefs in seven angels, a forgetful God, and other symbols and practices to ancient Mesopotamian beliefs. The deity of this city was Nergal, god of Mars. Simon links the Cuthites to the biblical Samaritans who apparently are still a small minority in Israel and still practice animal sacrifice as in the old ways.

Apparently they were also around Saudi Arabia in the early centuries A. The Samaritans were considered heretics by the Jews for worshipping idols. Mohammed was of the priestly tribe called the Quraysh who were in charge of the Black Stone of Mecca.

Simon suggests that the sacrifice of goats and sheep among Muslims on pilgrimage to Mecca harks back to pre-Islamic times and that the priests of the Quraysh tribe may have been the old priests of the war god Nergal at Cutha. The Quraysh tribe was known to be in Babylon around A. Nergal was known at this time period in Mesopotamia as well. He also notes a pre- Lovecraft occurrence of a Semitic version of the word Kutulu in a recently found version of — The Key of Solomon — thought to have been lost.

He suggests that perhaps Lovecraft had some sort of access to lost Arab magic information. In describing the key Middle Eastern influences on the Western occult traditions Simon offers the following:. Lovecraft gave a date of A. Crowley encountered the Yezidi in his travels and was quoted by Grant as saying that the rediscovery of the Sumerian tradition was a key goal of magick.

Aiwas was said by Crowley to have been the true name of the god of the Yezidis. Aiwas has also been equated to Shaitan and in several Thelemic rites is given as Shaitan-Aiwas. Though Simon thinks Lovecraft had access to authentic Arabic magic texts — perhaps the Necronomicon itself, Grant considered Lovecraft to have somehow channeled these authentic ancient currents. There is also mentioned a legendary?

Arabic grimoire called — The Veils of Negative Existence — which was said by occult scholar Francis King to have once been in the possession of the Golden Dawn. Simon goes through the initiatory structure in the Necronomicon where one encounters the Seven Gates — again equated to the planets, colors, symbols, and other correspondences.

Simon suggests that she did not return alone but brought dangerous magical forces with her. Also discussed is the possibility that the Sumerian religion refers to extraterrestrial contact — such as was mentioned and written extensively about by the late Zacharia Sitchin.

There is a ritual in the text of blood sacrifice — which really makes the detractors of the text cringe and consider it an evil satanic text — but as Simon points out — animal sacrifice was quite common in pagan times and is common then and today as well among Muslims and many other peoples. One would perhaps expect it from a non-Christianized sect of that time and place. Next Simon refutes much of the information floating around the internet about the book and how it came to be.

Though I have never read this book — Simon does take quotes from it and soundly refute them. He suggests that it is mostly an amateurish attack on his credibility, the authenticity of the text, and the danger of the text in leading to occult crime. Simon also notes a few other books he has penned about the Necronomicon: The Gates of the Necronomicon — and the Necronomicon Spellbook. There is another one I have by Donald Tyson that was published around the same times as — Dead Names — but I have not read it.

I really enjoyed this book — a fast and exciting read. Whether what - Simon says — is true or partially true or an elaborate hoax — it sure was a fun read. I read the Necronomicon many years ago and may have done some preliminary exercises with it but no major rituals. I do know a few people that have done some of the rites and I do recall some strange results.

The fact that the Necronomicon was published in small paperback format by Avon — as was this book — Dead Names — made it very inexpensive and available. It was a very good selling occult book compared to most in such a genre.

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Dead Names: The Dark History of the Necronomicon

Simon is a student of magic, occultism, and religion since the mids and the editor of the Necronomicon , Simon was a frequent lecturer for the famed Warlock Shop in Brooklyn and the Magickal Childe Bookstore in Manhattan for more than ten years before his sudden disappearance in , speaking on topics as diverse as religion and politics, occultism and fascism, ceremonial magic, demonolatry, the Tarot, the Qabala, and Asian occult systems. An ordained priest of an Eastern Orthodox church, Simon has appeared on television and radio discussing such topics as exorcism, satanism, and Nazism. The media events he organized in the s and s -- with rock bands, ritual performances, and celebrity appearances -- helped to promote the "occult renaissance" in New York City. After decades of study in European, Asian, and Latin American cult centers, this book marks his first public appearance in more than twenty years. Simon's "translation" of the Necronomicon exploited the name and legend of H. Lovecraft's invented book, but bore little resemblance to what Lovecraft's readers had come to expect. Now in this "history," memoir and answer to his critics, the author tries to have it both ways: his was not the Lovecraftian Necronomicon , but another work of blasphemous elder lore with the same title.

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Simon's "translation" of the Necronomicon exploited the name and legend of H. Lovecraft's invented book, but bore little resemblance to what Lovecraft's readers had come to expect. Now in this "history," memoir and answer to his critics, the author tries to have it both ways: his was not the Lovecraftian Necronomicon , but another work of blasphemous elder lore with the same title. Possibly Lovecraft had heard of it, Simon suggests. We are also asked to believe that the volume, like the Lovecraftian original, has a long and sinister history, including links to the Son of Sam murders, assorted suicides, the New York occult scene and even the World Trade Center attack. Lacking is any evidence that this is other than the work of the author's imagination. While the result may be of interest to students of the occult, it has little to offer to fantasy readers or Lovecraft fans.

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The dark history of the Necronomicon——one of the world's most feared and fascinating books——told by the one man who saw it all The Necronomicon is one of the most controversial books ever published. The master of Gothic suspense, H. Lovecraft, wrote about a mystical and dreaded grimoire, known as the Necronomicon——an ancient text written by an Arab that, if it were to fall into the wrong hands, could have disastrous consequences.

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