DIACHASMIMORPHA LONGICAUDATA PDF

Diachasmimorpha longicaudata is a solitary species of parasitoid wasp and an endoparasitoid of tephritid fruit fly larvae. It is now considered the most extensively used parasitoid for biocontrol of fruit flies in both the southern portion of the United States and Latin America. This has resulted in quarantines on grapefruit shipped internationally as well as domestically. It is likely multiple biological species separated by both reproductive isolation and morphological characteristics such as wing geometry. Diachasmimorpha longicaudata originated in the Indo-pacific region of Asia. The genus Diachasmimorpha has traditionally been defined by the morphology of their apically sinuate ovipositor.

Author:Majar Maum
Country:Bolivia
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Art
Published (Last):28 August 2007
Pages:142
PDF File Size:16.82 Mb
ePub File Size:17.84 Mb
ISBN:117-1-48762-979-5
Downloads:32497
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Taum



Diachasmimorpha longicaudata is a solitary species of parasitoid wasp and an endoparasitoid of tephritid fruit fly larvae. It is now considered the most extensively used parasitoid for biocontrol of fruit flies in both the southern portion of the United States and Latin America.

This has resulted in quarantines on grapefruit shipped internationally as well as domestically. It is likely multiple biological species separated by both reproductive isolation and morphological characteristics such as wing geometry. Diachasmimorpha longicaudata originated in the Indo-pacific region of Asia. The genus Diachasmimorpha has traditionally been defined by the morphology of their apically sinuate ovipositor.

The adult male is smaller than the female with a body length of up to 4. The body is a reddish-brown color and antennae are longer than the body. Wings are clear. Females have a long ovipositor. The gaster of males and females differs slightly with the female having a dorsal central black band while the gaster of the male has a dark brown to black dorsal posterior.

Three cryptic species have been identified within D. Subspecies have also been reported based on differing geographical areas with high variation being associated variation of resources.

Both males and females are solitary. Third instar t ephritid fruit fly larvae are the typical hosts. Females lay eggs per day using her elongated ovipositor to reach the fly larvae. Typically only one egg is laid per instar larvae with exceptions when hosts are insufficient; however only one pupa will reach maturity. Diachasmimorpha longicaudata entomopoxvirus DlEPV is a notable symbiotic virus that affects Diachasmimorpha longicaudata.

These viruses are found within the adult wasps and retained in subsequent generations. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Diachasma longicaudata Female D. Florida Entomologist. Biological Control. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. Retrieved Journal of Insect Science. Archives of Virology. Journal of Insect Physiology. Non-poly-DNA viruses, their parasitic wasps and hosts. Categories : Braconidae Wasps.

Hidden categories: Articles with 'species' microformats. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Contribute Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file.

In other projects Wikispecies. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

E5EK OMRON PDF

Associated Content

Does Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Hymenoptera: Braconidae have a preferential instar to parasitize Tephritidae Diptera? Roberta A. Simone M. Luiza R.

CHROMATIC DISPERSION PPT PDF

Metrics details. Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Hymenoptera: Braconidae is a solitary parasitoid of Tephritidae Diptera fruit flies of economic importance currently being mass-reared in bio-factories and successfully used worldwide. A peculiar biological aspect of Hymenoptera is its haplo-diploid life cycle, where females diploid develop from fertilized eggs and males haploid from unfertilized eggs. Diploid males were described in many species and recently evidenced in D.

GABRA A MLINKA PDF

We'd like to understand how you use our websites in order to improve them. Register your interest. Cohorts of mass-reared, naive Diachasmimorpha longicaudata , parasitoids of tephritid fruit flies, were released in a laminar airflow wind tunnel to study their responses to visual and olfactory stimuli associated with their host habitat. Parasitoids were five times more likely to land on yellow plastic spheres emitting the odor of ripe, guava fruit Psidium guajava L. The rate of landing was not modified by the presence of green artificial leaves adjacent to the spheres in the tunnel or by the inclusion of green leaf volatiles emanating with the guava odors.

Related Articles