HAPPINESS SOLD SEPARATELY BY LOLLY WINSTON PDF

The marriage of Ted and Elinor Mackey, a yuppie podiatrist-lawyer couple in their earlys living in Northern California, is pushed to the brink when Elinor learns that Ted is having an affair with his trainer, Gina Ellison. Elinor's reaction—pity—surprises her. Winston Good Grief adroitly makes it clear that Ted's affair is a symptom: infertility problems have caused years of emotional turmoil. And Gina's no bimbo: she has a loving but difficult relationship with Ted, complicated further by her young son, Toby, and his immediate attachment to Ted as a stable father figure. When Elinor confronts Ted and Gina, Ted quickly ends the affair; neither is sure if infidelity or infertility should end their marriage. During their separation, Elinor takes a sabbatical from her law firm and casually dates Noah Orch, a hunky but dull arborist.

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After two painful years of trying, Elinor has learned that she can't have children. All the doctors can tell her is that it's probably because of her age. As she turns forty, she withdraws into an interior world of heartbreak.

Elinor's loving husband, Ted, a successful podiatrist, has always done the right thing, too. Then he meets the wrong woman at the wrong time, and does the wrong thing. Ted's lover, Gina—a beautiful and kindhearted nutritionist—always eats the right thing, but is unlucky in love and always falls for the wrong men.

Soon Ted has to fight to make everything right again. Can Elinor and Ted's marriage be saved? The answer is alarmingly fresh and unexpected as New York Times bestselling author Lolly Winston introduces us to characters as memorable as those of Anne Tyler and Nick Hornby, but who are indelibly all her own. From the publisher. With stints in journalism and public relations, plus an M.

Still, her initial goal wasn't to write a bestseller — it was just to finish the manuscript. The year before she turned forty, Winston took a hiatus from her other writing to complete Good Grief , the wry and touching story of a young woman coping with the death of her husband.

Far from collecting dust in a drawer, Winston's novel flew off the shelves. It was chosen as a No. Good Grief renders the mourning process with such intimacy and accuracy that readers may wonder whether Winston herself is a widow. She isn't, but she did lose both her parents while she was still a young woman. Grief didn't hit me for a while. I even found myself resenting the mourners at our house.

How could they accept his death so readily? Months after my father's death I started breaking down. I remember sitting at my desk at work one day, unable to pick up my pencil.

After her depression began to subside, Winston realized she wanted to write about what grief was really like—including "the messy, quirky aspects of grief. She also struggles to keep living and moving forward, even though she can't at first imagine what her future will be like. The result is a blend of pathos and humor that rings true for many readers. I've always loved novels that are funny and sad at the same time. The Bell Jar , Lolita.

If you go back and re-read those books, you rediscover their humor with surprise. Suicidal depression, funny? Pedophilia, funny? Somehow, yes. You don't ever want to get burned with hot grits. I was demoted, and that's how I wound up working in the kitchen and working various cooking jobs throughout college and grad school. This is an autobiographical part of Good Grief. I learned to boogie board and dance the hula and barbecue in the wind without using any lighter fluid. My 20s were basically one long summer.

Then I had to come home from camp and grow up and face the real world. I cut and file my cats' nails, brush their teeth, and write songs for them. Flannery O'Connor. I began reading her short stories when I was 15—around the time I started writing fiction.

My first short story attempts were poor Flannery O'Connor imitations. You can't write southern gothic fiction if you're from Hartford, Connecticut.

I think O'Connor is one of the best descriptive writers. I also like how she puts characters in extreme situations that serve to reveal their true natures.

The way she blends horrifying and humorous details in the same story is brilliant. Critics Say. Lolly Winston's warmhearted second novel is a natural crowd-pleaser that deserves critical respect as well. She tackles difficult subjects—infidelity, infertility, a failing marriage and a troubled kid—with honesty and empathy for her floundering protagonists. Her plain-spoken prose and a not-too-gritty resolution should make this a book-group favorite.

But Winston doesn't court popular appeal with easy laughs or shallow reassurances; her characters feel genuine sorrow and suffer real damage. Wendy Smith - Washington Post. A tender, wry, beautifully crafted story about a marriage in trouble Winston narrates the novel from several points of view, and in the process makes all of her characters sympathetic. Their voices are real and thoroughly human.

There's nothing easy about this story. It's complicated, messy, and unpredictable—like real life. Boston Globe. Winston is not afraid to show us at our worst and make us laugh, and her compassionate insight into the ways we screw up—and heal ourselves—makes Happiness Sold Separately quite a bargain.

Miami Herald. The marriage of Ted and Elinor Mackey, a yuppie podiatrist-lawyer couple in their earlys living in Northern California, is pushed to the brink when Elinor learns that Ted is having an affair with his trainer, Gina Ellison.

Elinor's reaction—pity—surprises her. Winston adroitly makes it clear that Ted's affair is a symptom: infertility problems have caused years of emotional turmoil. And Gina's no bimbo: she has a loving but difficult relationship with Ted, complicated further by her young son, Toby, and his immediate attachment to Ted as a stable father figure.

When Elinor confronts Ted and Gina, Ted quickly ends the affair; neither is sure if infidelity or infertility should end their marriage. During their separation, Elinor takes a sabbatical from her law firm and casually dates Noah Orch, a hunky but dull arborist. Ted haphazardly resumes his relationship with Gina. As he realizes that his connection to her is more than an escape from a bad marriage, all concerned have decisions to make.

Winston has a real feel for the push and pull of a marriage in crisis, and delivers it in a brisk, funny, no-nonsense style that still comes off as respectful of the material. Publishers Weekly. Starred review. At the beginning of the story, the listener is prepared for another saga of quirky but charming troubles in the lives of a successful professional couple who seem to have made all the right choices for a nearly perfect life. This couple's troubles are not charming at all, as it turns out, but overwhelming and truly heartbreaking.

Elinor, nearing 40 and unable to have a baby, and her husband, Ted, have become entangled in the fertility treatment machine that includes temperature-taking, long waits in clinics, consultations, and hope held out and then dashed. Ted is especially perplexed by this frustrating, fruitless process but willing to lend his support to help his wife with her dreams. At his gym, Ted falls for a beautiful but complicated young woman with a long history of falling for the wrong guy at the wrong time.

She has a geeky, needy eight-year-old son who latches onto Ted when he offers his services as a tutor. Winston, skilled at revealing layers of conflicting, strong emotion and behavior, is definitely a writer to watch. Highly recommended for public libraries.

Barbara Valle - Library Journal. A deceptively breezy, thoughtful look at the emotional complexities of a childless suburban California marriage. Lawyer Elinor Mackey's discovery that husband Ted, a podiatrist, is having an affair with his gym trainer, Gina, just scratches the surface of troublesome issues in the Mackeys' relationship.

Forty-year-old Elinor has been trying to have a baby, enduring exhausting hormone injections and a miscarriage; Ted has stood by her stoically, even tenderly, though their sex life is shot. Immersed in her work as a top-notch international employee-relations lawyer in Silicon Valley, Elinor is addicted to writing lists and sorting the laundry, leaving little room for romance or even dinner with her husband. Ted wonders why she's no fun anymore and readily succumbs to Gina's seduction.

Winston doesn't wrestle much with the moral questions raised by a middle-aged man falling for his trainer, nor does she offer any facile condemnation of one party or the other, delighting instead in complicating the plot at every turn. Just as the Mackeys separate and seem to be making headway in therapy, Gina's emotionally needy ten-year-old son Toby and who knew she had a son? Ted begins to tutor Toby, perhaps out of guilt, and then starts sleeping with Gina again.

She remains wary, having been damaged and left vulnerable by various men in her life. Ted's initial feeling for her morphs from pity into possibly real love, while Elinor, more emotionally detached, attracts the local tree surgeon as well as the young man who comes to clean her house. And yet Ted loves El and only wants to be with her doesn't he? Pregnancy—at last—cannot save this doomed marriage, as Elinor laments, "It's not about having a baby, it's about having a family.

Winston Good Grief , skillfully comes into her own with this brave second novel. Kirkus Reviews top of page. The story is told from multiple points of view. Did you find that reading each character's point of view allowed you to understand their "side" of the story better? Once you got inside a new character's head, were there things you learned about them that made them more sympathetic to you? At one point, Ted seems to be in love with two women at the same time.

Do you think this is possible for some people? Do you think he is in love with Elinor, or does he just love her?

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Happiness Sold Separately

Search: Title Author Article. Rate this book. In the tradition of Anne Tyler, John Cheever, and Tom Perotta, Winston's second novel looks beyond the manicured surface of suburbia to a world of loss, longing, lust, and betrayal. Elinor Mackey has lived her life in perfect order: college, law school, marriage, successful corporate career. But suddenly her world is falling apart. In her late 30s, she's discovered that she and her podiatrist husband, Ted, can't have children.

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HAPPINESS SOLD SEPARATELY

Winston Good Grief, skillfully comes into her own with this brave second novel. A deceptively breezy, thoughtful look at the emotional complexities of a childless suburban California marriage. Forty-year-old Elinor has been trying to have a baby, enduring exhausting hormone injections and a miscarriage; Ted has stood by her stoically, even tenderly, though their sex life is shot. Immersed in her work as a top-notch international employee-relations lawyer in Silicon Valley, Elinor is addicted to writing lists and sorting the laundry, leaving little room for romance or even dinner with her husband. Ted begins to tutor Toby, perhaps out of guilt, and then starts sleeping with Gina again. She remains wary, having been damaged and left vulnerable by various men in her life.

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