JAMES MELLAART PDF

These Neolithic settlements contained not only the earliest textiles and pottery known to man but also the earliest paintings found on walls as distinct from caves. Mellaart explained that the original murals had proved impossible to remove or preserve. They were damaged, he said, and been impossible to photograph before they crumbled to plaster dust. Indeed, the only evidence of their existence were hurried sketches made by Mellaart and not released to public examination until , when they only added to the debate.

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These Neolithic settlements contained not only the earliest textiles and pottery known to man but also the earliest paintings found on walls as distinct from caves. Mellaart explained that the original murals had proved impossible to remove or preserve. They were damaged, he said, and been impossible to photograph before they crumbled to plaster dust. Indeed, the only evidence of their existence were hurried sketches made by Mellaart and not released to public examination until , when they only added to the debate.

There was no independent way of testing the accuracy, even the existence, of these frescoes, which Mellaart said depicted erupting volcanoes, scenes of men sowing and tending livestock the earliest evidence of the domestication of cattle , and formalised patterns of animals, birds and human figures in which Mellaart detected the origins of the Turkish kilim.

In he had astounded historians of the ancient world by claiming that he had been shown a hoard of treasure — gold and silver bracelets, jewellery and a fabulous collection of bronze and silver figurines — that had been illegally dug up at Dorak during the Turko-Greek war from two royal tombs of the Yortans, neighbours of the Trojans.

Among the treasures, he said, were fragments of a gold sheet adorned with Egyptian hieroglyphics bearing the name of Pharaoh Sahure believed to have ruled between and BC. There he found a trove of similar objects taken from ancient tombs at Dorak.

Although having no camera, and forbidden by his new acquaintance from hiring a photographer, Mellaart spent four days sketching the objects and taking rubbings. But when his findings were published by the Illustrated London News, a Turkish newspaper accused Mellaart of having robbed the tombs himself and smuggled the treasure out. The name she had given — Anna Papastrati — turned out to be unknown and her address did not exist.

Some experts have suggested that the mysterious girl was a honeytrap working for a gang of dealers seeking authentication for their treasure from a respected archaeologist before selling it to a wealthy collector. Mellaart, who stoutly maintained the truth of his story, was inclined to agree. Another theory held that while the Dorak treasure did exist in whole or in part, Anna Papastrati did not.

James Mellaart was born on November 14 in London. His Dutch immigrant father, descended from Scottish migrants called Maclarty a division of the Clan Macdonald , was an expert in Dutch Old Master paintings and drawings.

When Jimmy was six, the family moved to Holland following a downturn in the art market. When he was 11 an uncle gave him a book on ancient Egypt. He was spellbound; as a teenager he taught himself Ancient Egyptian, followed by Ancient Greek and Latin.

At the outbreak of war he was drafted to serve in the slave labour force of the occupying Nazis. Surrounded by archaeological finds from around the world Mellaart sealed his fascination with antiquities.

Even as a boy he seemed to have had an sixth-sense for ancient remains: he found an Iron Age brooch on a seemingly barren hill fort in Herefordshire, and, on a trip to Cyprus, a hoard of Mycenaean bronze. In what was then Palestine, he was sent out one morning into the Biblical city of Jericho to look for tombs by the archaeologist Kathleen Kenyon, a pupil of the celebrated Sir Mortimer Wheeler.

Mellaart returned at lunchtime to say he had found one, intact. On her return, Mellaart explained that he knew they could dig no further because instead of pottery fragments he had found fish fossils. There, with almost the first slice of the spade, he discovered the ruins of a Neolithic city. Under a huge mound 20 metres high, 13 layers of habitation were revealed that dated back 9, years and housed up to 10, people. He was for two years a lecturer at Istanbul University, but as pressure against him mounted in Turkey he left, in , to take an appointment to lecture in Anatolian archaeology at the University of London, where he remained until Mellaart was the author of several books, as well as chapters in Cambridge Ancient History and numerous scholarly articles in Anatolian Studies and other learned and specialist journals.

Terms and Conditions. Style Book. Weather Forecast. Accessibility links Skip to article Skip to navigation. Friday 05 June James Mellaart James Mellaart, who has died aged 86, ranked among the most controversial archaeologists of the 20th century after claiming to have uncovered priceless royal artefacts plundered from Dorak, near the ancient city of Troy, which he said had been missing since the site was first excavated in the s.

James Mellaart. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in He married, in , Arlette Meryem Cenani, with whom he had a son. James Mellaart, born November 14 , died July 29

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James Mellaart: The Man Who Changed History

J ames Mellaart — is one of the most dazzling researchers in Anatolian archaeology. An archaeologically interested audience around the globe followed his successes in the field. Nothing Mellaart did was irrelevant — both researchers and laymen admired him for his pioneering work, the fact that he had the courage to draw sweeping conclusions, his enthralling, amply illustrated lectures, and the sheer endless series of gripping books showcasing his detailed first-hand knowledge. Despite this, accusations abound that some of the alleged archaeological artifacts that Mellaart presented in the form of drawings could have sprung from his imagination.

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James Mellaart: Pioneer…..and Forger

He was expelled from Turkey when he was suspected of involvement with the antiquities black market. He was also involved in a string of controversies, including the so-called mother goddess controversy [1] in Anatolia , which eventually led to his being banned from excavations in Turkey in the s. Mellaart was born in in London. In Mellaart began to direct excavations on the sites in Turkey with the assistance of his Turkish-born wife Arlette , who was the secretary of BIAA. He helped to identify the "champagne-glass" pottery of western Anatolia in the Late Bronze Age, which in led to [ citation needed ] the discovery of Beycesultan. After that expedition's completion in , he helped to publish its results.

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