THE FLOWERPOT CRUCIBLE FURNACE PDF

Some of my early memories are of exploring my grandfathers workshop in Colorado Springs, CO. Today I made the first steps to making that happen. Well, as of today I do. It walks you through the steps from creating a furnace out of a flowerpot and a few other ingredients to melting aluminum in it. When I put my shadow over the exhaust hole you can see it glowing red already:. I found it interesting that no aluminum stuck to the briquette:.

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In this instructable I'm making a classic flowerpot furnace, so called because its shell is a terracotta flower pot. Large terracotta pot mine is about mm diameter 1 x 25 kg bag of fire clay 1 x 20 kg bag of Portland cement 1 x 1 kg bag of perlite 1 x 3" diameter steel pipe 1 x mm plastic plant pot. When I made my furnace, I was living on a 4 acre property so I didn't have to worry about smoke or noise Did you use this instructable in your classroom?

Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. I started with a large terracotta pot mm diameter and drilled and chiseled a hole in the side for my air intake pipe. The steel pipe that I used was an old piece of steel tube fencing that I had lying around on the farm.

What you are looking for in a steel pipe is something that you can attach to the outlet of your vacuum cleaner. I had to make a custom connection for my vacuum as it didn't have any.

Mix the fire-clay, cement and perlite together in a large tub or in a wheelbarrow. The mix that I used was fire-clay, cement, perlite.

The dry mix was turned over and thoroughly mixed together. Make a well in the middle of the mix and add in about 3 liters of water until it is a stiff mortar-like mixture. Put about 3" of mixture into the bottom of the pot to the bottom of the air-hole and pack it thoroughly. I used a steel rod to pack it down and make sure that I got all of the air bubbles out. Put the plastic pot into the center of the terracotta pot and put your air pipe into the hole.

Pack the wet mix around the air pipe Keep adding more of the mix into the void between the terracotta pot and the plastic pot while packing the mix as you go. Bring the mix up to about 2" from the top of the terracotta pot and smooth it down as much as possible.

Now, you want to put a garbage bag over the pot and leave it to cure. I left mine for a week, but then, I was busy. When the refractory is cured, remove the plastic pot from the furnace. The pot was a little bit stuck in my furnace, so I used a sharp knife to convince it to come out. Filling the furnace with tinder and then putting some fire to it, I kept the furnace cooking for a good four hours.

You need the fire to heat the refractory without being hot enough to make it expand. The ash is an insulator and it helps to keep the heat inside the pot. The idea for the cook is to drive the last of the water out of the refractory so that when we really apply the heat, you don't get pockets of water vapor that will want to escape quickly e. Slow and gentle is your friend.

Put some oil soaked paper into the bottom of the furnace near the air hole and charge the furnace with coking coal, coke, briquettes, whatever you are going to use when you get this baby cooking. Light the paper using a lit stick, straw or a long match and get the fire going.

Let the fire catch well and then insert the air-pipe into the air-pipe-hole and attach the air-pipe to an air supply for instance, the exhaust of your trusty shop-vacuum. Start your vacuum on as low as possible so that you don't put the fire out. When your furnace is hot enough, you can lower a crucible filled with scrap metal into the furnace and let it cook. This is when you need to have a steel scraper to remove the oxidized aluminium from the top of the melt.

If you have a degas, you would add it after you've de-scummed the melt. Hello, did you get many burns out of the pot without cracking. How did the fire-clay, cement and perlite mixture hold up. I think your mixture was fire-clay, cement and perlite rather than correct me if I'm not understanding that. Reply 2 months ago. Hi Cranklin66, yep it was mix. I got about 2 dozen burns out of it before it started to crack Actually, the interior around the air intake started to melt at around that time.

The only place that the furnace cracked was in the exterior terracotta pot, the refractory didn't crack at all. Sorry for the delay :. Reply 3 years ago. No, I cut the plastic pots out. No need to poison myself with the toxic fumes from the burning plastic : Plus, the molten plastic soaks into the refractory and makes a mess.

However, after several high temperature burns, there'd be nothing left of it, if you were to leave it in :. With a controlled firing rate, you can probably get your melt time down to 12 minutes, many guys tend to blow a lot of the heat out of the foundry by using too much air, also a lid will help tremendously as well, still a good build for this type of hobby.

Thanks for the tip. I plan to make a valve for the air input to help to control it and, yep a refractory lid is on the menu as well! Introduction: Flowerpot Furnace - a Home Foundry. By baelza. More by the author:. About: I have been working in IT since the mid 's. Most of that has been database and application development.

I've been working on Internet application development since the late 's. I've just moved back More About baelza. Materials Large terracotta pot mine is about mm diameter 1 x 25 kg bag of fire clay 1 x 20 kg bag of Portland cement 1 x 1 kg bag of perlite 1 x 3" diameter steel pipe 1 x mm plastic plant pot When I made my furnace, I was living on a 4 acre property so I didn't have to worry about smoke or noise Add Teacher Note.

I left the furnace for another day and then, on Sunday I cooked it. You can go back and do this as often as you like Finally, it's time for some heat! When the fire is thoroughly going, increase the power on your vacuum.

When mine is going, it sounds like a jet engine! When melting aluminium, it took about 20 minutes to turn 1 kg of aluminium into liquid. Of course, you have some fire-tongs to remove the crucible Did you make this project? Share it with us! I Made It! Mini Wooden Foosball Box Project!

Table Saw Class 16, Enrolled. Cranklin66 6 months ago. Reply Upvote. Great project! Do you leave the plastic pot in and burn it out? Hey patriot7, thanks for the compliment.

However, after several high temperature burns, there'd be nothing left of it, if you were to leave it in : Kind regards. BeachsideHank 3 years ago. Hey BeachsideHank, Thanks for the tip. Thanks again!

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Flowerpot Furnace - a Home Foundry

In this instructable I'm making a classic flowerpot furnace, so called because its shell is a terracotta flower pot. Large terracotta pot mine is about mm diameter 1 x 25 kg bag of fire clay 1 x 20 kg bag of Portland cement 1 x 1 kg bag of perlite 1 x 3" diameter steel pipe 1 x mm plastic plant pot. When I made my furnace, I was living on a 4 acre property so I didn't have to worry about smoke or noise Did you use this instructable in your classroom?

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BTAIM I have used thick walled stainless steel creamers to melt small amounts several ounces at a time of silver or brass or bronze in my forge for pouring. Note that these degrade fairly fast. One particularly thick one lasted for four pours! If you are not trained in the safety issues involving molten metal PLEASE find someone who can show you what's involved; there are backyard metal casters everywhere and working with someone who knows what they are doing can save you a world of hurt! I consider molten metal to be much more dangerous than steel that's hundreds of degrees hotterand I've worked with both!

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